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  #101  
Old 11th September 2017, 10:54 PM
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Jerry Pournelle.

.......... (and why colonising other planets isn't a solution);
Alas alack, a brilliant man and writer. Not only did he express his thoughts in essays, he managed to get them across in his works as well, which I think had a much wider impact. There may not have been many people who read his essays on overpopulation and why colonising other worlds wasn't a solution, but he made it clear in Mote in God's Eye (with Larry Niven) why this wasn't a solution, and I think that's very important. People who never would have thought to read his essays would have absorbed the same message through his fiction!

When my favourite authors pass it always gives me a feeling that I should write down these dozens of books I have in my head, they may not be comparable in quality and ideas, but it would be sad to see it all go when I go!
Write, damn you, write!
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  #102  
Old 14th September 2017, 12:22 PM
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One of the books that circulated clandestinely at my boarding-school was The Ginger Man. I was radicalised by the finest!

J.P. Donleavy, Acclaimed Author of ‘The Ginger Man,’ Dies at 91 - NY Times

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The novelist and playwright J. P. Donleavy at Levington Park, the County Westmeath, Ireland, estate where he had lived since the 1970s. Credit Kenneth O Halloran
J. P. Donleavy, the expatriate American author whose 1955 novel “The Ginger Man” shook up the literary world with its combination of sexual frankness and outrageous humor, died on Monday at a hospital near his home in Mullingar, County Westmeath, Ireland. He was 91.

His sister, Mary Rita Donleavy, said the cause was a stroke.

Mr. Donleavy had considerable trouble finding a publisher for “The Ginger Man,” his bawdily adventurous story of 1940s university life in Dublin, which he described to The New York Times in 2000 as “celebratory, boisterous and resolutely careless mayhem.”

The playwright Brendan Behan, a friend, suggested that Mr. Donleavy send the manuscript to Olympia Press in Paris. This worked out well, in that Olympia accepted the book, and not well, in that it was published as part of the Traveler’s Companion series, which was known for erotica.

“That was basically the end of my career,” Mr. Donleavy told The Times. “I was ‘a dirty book writer’ out of Paris.” In fact, he went on to write many other successful novels.

“The Ginger Man” — whose bohemian American-in-Ireland antihero, Sebastian Dangerfield, has been described as impulsive, destructive, wayward, cruel, a monster, a clown and a psychopath — was both banned and burned in Ireland. When it was published in the United States in 1958, Chapter 10 was omitted, along with numerous sentences here and there.

The novel eventually won critical acclaim and public acceptance, so much so that it is now considered a contemporary classic, selling more than 45 million copies worldwide. Mr. Donleavy was compared to James Joyce and hailed as a forerunner of both the black humor movement and the London playwrights known as the Angry Young Men.
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  #103  
Old 16th September 2017, 07:41 AM
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Another for the horror fans.

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Some of the most iconic pieces of classic monster art were found on the front covers of Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine throughout the ’60s and ’70s, that art no doubt responsible for countless monster kids being bitten by the proverbial bug. Vibrant and eye-catching, the magazine’s cover art made horror stylish, beautiful and cool.

Those paintings were the work of illustrator Basil Gogos, who we’re sad to report is the latest in a long line of true horror legends who have recently left us.
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  #104  
Old 16th September 2017, 08:50 AM
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Harry Dean Stanton, Quintessential American Actor, Dies at 91

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Rarely a leading man, the Kentucky native was memorable in 'Paris, Texas,' 'Repo Man,' 'Alien' and 'Big Love.'

Harry Dean Stanton, the character actor with the world-weary face who carved out an exceptional career playing grizzled loners and colorful, offbeat characters in such films as Paris, Texas and Repo Man, has died. He was 91.

Stanton, who also was memorable in Cool Hand Luke (1967), Two-Lane Blacktop (1971), Ridley Scott’s Alien (1979), John Carpenter’s Escape From New York (1981) and John Hughes’ Pretty in Pink (1986) — in fact, what wasn’t he memorable in? — died Friday afternoon of natural causes at Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles, his agent, John Kelly, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Stanton was eerily creepy as evil polygamist and self-proclaimed Mormon prophet Roman Grant on HBO’s Big Love, and he partnered regularly with David Lynch, appearing in the director’s Wild at Heart (1990), Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), the 1993 miniseries Hotel Room, The Straight Story (1999) and Inland Empire (2006). (He said he turned down a meeting with Lynch about playing Dennis Hopper’s part as a serial killer in Blue Velvet.)

Stanton was great pals with actor Jack Nicholson, and they roomed together in a Laurel Canyon house on Skyline Drive in the early 1960s. (Nicholson moved in after sharing a place with screenwriter Robert Towne.) They first appeared together in Monte Hellman’s Ride in the Whirlwind (1966), which Nicholson also wrote, and Stanton always said he learned about “acting natural” from that experience.

“Harry, I’ve got this part for you. His name is Blind Dick Reilly, and he’s the head of the gang. He’s got a patch over one eye and a derby hat,” Stanton, in a 2008 interview with Esquire, recalled Nicholson pitching him. “Then he says, ‘But I don’t want you to do anything. Let the wardrobe play the character.’ Which meant, just play yourself. That became my whole approach."

He and Nicholson caroused and worked together in Arthur Penn’s The Missouri Breaks (1976), Man Trouble (1992), The Pledge (2001) and Anger Management (2003). Stanton also became friends with Marlon Brando, another actor from Missouri Breaks, and they engaged in long phone calls for years before Brando’s death in 2004.

Meanwhile, Stanton was an elegant musical performer with an angelic tenor voice. He sang and played rhythm guitar and harmonica in a Tex-Mex band that did weekly gigs at The Mint in Los Angeles. (He also was a regular in front of and behind the bar at Dan Tana's in West Hollywood.)

He played a convict and sang in Cool Hand Luke, coaching Paul Newman’s character on the song “Plastic Jesus.” Years later, he portrayed an Ozark musician in Chrystal (2004).

So it’s no surprise that Stanton bonded with Kris Kristofferson and recommended that his friend work with him in the title role of a former 1960s rock star on the downside in 1972’s Cisco Pike. (It was the country singer’s first leading role.) A year later, he befriended Bob Dylan during the difficult shoot for Sam Peckinpah’s somber western Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973).

With his hangdog, morose visage and faced etched with crevices, Stanton was known for playing characters of innate sadness or darkness. The omnipresent cigarette dangling from his lips helped with that.

Stanton had been working for decades as a character actor and was well into his 50s when he got his first lead role, playing Travis, a man and father broken by unrequited love, in Wim Wenders’ classic road movie Paris, Texas (1984).

“After all these years, I finally got the part I wanted to play,” Stanton once said. “If I never did another film after Paris, Texas, I’d be happy.”

Wrote Roger Ebert in a 2002 critique of the film: “Stanton has long inhabited the darker corners of American noir, with his lean face and hungry eyes, and here he creates a sad poetry.”

Stanton also sang on the film’s Ry Cooder soundtrack, performing a haunting Mexicali waltz, “Cancion Mixteca,” in Spanish.

In Alex Cox’s satirical cult sensation Repo Man (1984), Stanton recruits a young punk rocker (Emilio Estevez) to seize cars, just like him.

“Harry is a walking contradiction,” Sophie Huber, who directed the 2012 documentary Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction, said in a 2013 interview with The Guardian. “He has this pride in appearing to not have to work hard to be good. He definitely does not want to be seen to be trying.”

Harry Dean Stanton was born on July 14, 1926, in West Irvine, Ky., a small tobacco-growing community. His father was a farmer and a barber, his mother a hairdresser. Following high school, Stanton served in the Navy as a cook on an ammunitions ship in the Pacific during World War II — he was in the Battle of Okinawa — then enrolled at the University of Kentucky to study journalism and radio arts.

Since 2011, the Kentucky city of Lexington each year has hosted a Harry Dean Stanton Festival.

In 1949, Stanton hopped a Greyhound bus to California to enroll at the Pasadena Playhouse. He performed on L.A. stages and toured as a singer with a Baptist preacher and spent time in New York studying acting with Stella Adler.

Stanton was touring with a children’s play when he quit during a stop in California, deciding to try his hand in television and films. His first credit came in 1954 when he appeared on the series Inner Sanctum, and Alfred Hitchcock gave him a bit part as a Department of Corrections employee in The Wrong Man (1956).

Starting out, Stanton often played menacing black hats or crusty sidekicks on such TV shows as The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, U.S. Marshal, Bat Masterson, The Rifleman, Johnny Ringo and The Untouchables.

He landed his first significant part as the son of an evil rancher in the Michael Curtiz Western The Proud Rebel (1958), also starring Alan Ladd and Olivia de Havilland.

In Hellman’s Two-Lane Blacktop (1971), Stanton has just a few minutes on screen — playing a lonely, gay hitchhiker who puts a hand on Warren Oates’ knee — but he’s unforgettable.

The quintessentially American actor was hired by such famed directors as Francis Ford Coppola (1974’s The Godfather: Part II), John Huston (1979’s Wise Blood), Robert Altman (1985’s Fool for Love), Martin Scorsese (1988’s The Last Temptation of Christ), John Frankenheimer (1990’s The Fourth War) and Frank Darabont (1999’s The Green Mile).

His other notable film credits include Kelly’s Heroes (1970), Dillinger (1973), Farewell, My Lovely (1975), 92 in the Shade (1975), Straight Time (1978), Private Benjamin (1980), Red Dawn (1984), Stars and Bars (1988), Never Talk to Strangers (1995), She’s So Lovely (1997) and The Mighty (1998).

More recently, he appeared in The Avengers (2012), Seven Psychopaths (2012) and Lucky (2017) and on the series Getting On at HBO and Lynch's Twin Peaks revival at Showtime.

He never wanted to be a leading man. “Too much work,” he said.

Except for a brief marriage, Stanton was a bachelor who in the Partly Fiction documentary spoke about the lost love of his life, actress Rebecca De Mornay. “She left me for Tom Cruise,” he says in the film. Deborah Harry, whom he also dated, recorded a 1989 song for him, “I Want That Man.”

His agent said that Stanton "is survived by family and friends who loved him."

Stanton said his religious philosophy was “closer to Taoism or Zen Buddism, because it’s the most practical.” Ruminating about death in a 2013 interview in The New Yorker, he said, “When you’re deep asleep and not dreaming, where the fuck are you? There’s total blackness, it’s nothing, right? So I’m hoping that’s what death is, that it’s all gonna go. I don’t want to deal with any consciousness afterward.”
I think I'll watch Repo Man tonight in his honour.
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  #105  
Old 18th September 2017, 02:28 PM
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[Russia Today]

A Soviet officer who prevented a nuclear crisis between the US and the USSR and possible World War III in the 1980s has quietly passed away. He was 77. In 2010 RT spoke to Stanislav Petrov, who never considered himself a hero. We look at the life of the man who saved the world.

A decision that Soviet lieutenant colonel Stanislav Petrov once took went down in history as one that stopped the Cold War from turning into nuclear Armageddon, largely thanks to Karl Schumacher, a political activist from Germany who helped the news of his heroism first reach a western audience nearly two decades ago.
.....
On September 26, 1983, Stanislav Petrov was on duty in charge of an early warning radar system in a bunker near Moscow, when just past midnight he saw the radar screen showing a single missile inbound from the United States and headed toward the Soviet Union.
====
rest:
https://www.rt.com/news/403625-nucle...-officer-died/
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  #106  
Old 21st September 2017, 08:19 AM
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Lillian Ross, pioneering New Yorker literary journalist, dies aged 99 - ABC

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Lillian Ross, the ever-watchful New Yorker reporter whose close narrative style defined a memorable and influential 70-year career, including a revealing portrait of Ernest Hemingway, a classic Hollywood expose and a confession to an adulterous affair, has died aged 99.

Ross died after suffering a stroke, New Yorker articles editor Susan Morrison said. The publication's editor David Remnick called Ross a ground-breaking writer.

"Lillian would knock my block off for saying so, she'd find it pretentious, but she really was a pioneer, both as a woman writing at The New Yorker and as a truly innovative artist, someone who helped change and shape non-fiction writing in English," Remnick said in a statement.

Hundreds of Ross' Talk of the Town dispatches appeared in The New Yorker, starting in the 1940s when she wrote about Harry Truman's years as a haberdasher, and continuing well into the 21st century.

After the death of J.D. Salinger in 2010, Ross wrote a piece about her friendship with the reclusive novelist and former New Yorker contributor.

Her methods were as crystallised and instinctive as her writing.

She hated tape recorders, calling them "fast, easy and lazy", trusted first impressions and believed in the "mystical force" that "makes the work seem delightfully easy and natural and supremely enjoyable".

"It's sort of like having sex," she once wrote.

Ross regarded herself as a short story writer who worked with facts, or even as a director, trying to "build scenes into little story-films".

In 1999, her 1964 collection of articles, Reporting, was selected by a panel of experts as one of the 100 best examples of American journalism in the 20th century.
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  #107  
Old 21st September 2017, 03:51 PM
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Dr Evelyn Scott, Indigenous rights activist and 'trailblazer', dies aged 81

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Among the towering figures of Australia's Aboriginal and Islander communities, Dr Evelyn Scott AO, stood proud and tall.

The Indigenous educator and social justice campaigner has died in far north Queensland aged 81, and is being remembered as a trailblazer who changed Australia.

She possessed a striking presence, often wearing her signature black hat, perhaps to lessen the glare of the spotlight in which she worked, even into her later years.

The grand-daughter of a man brought to Queensland from Vanuatu in chains as a slave labourer to work the sugar fields, Dr Scott took to heart her own father's words: "If you don't think something is right, then challenge it."

The motto would mark her life and her role at pivotal moments in the history of the nation.

Finding friendships with the likes of Eddie Mabo, Faith Bandler and Joe McGuinness to name just a few, Dr Scott was a tireless and determined fighter for the equal rights of Indigenous Australians.

She was one of the leading figures of the decade-long campaign to change the constitution, allowing for the Commonwealth to make laws for Indigenous people and to have Indigenous people included in official census data.

The 1967 vote remains the most successful referendum in Australian history.

Dr Scott became the first general-secretary of the Indigenous-controlled Federal Council for the Advancement of Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders (FCAATSI) in 1973.

This heralded a new era of Indigenous political activism and the push for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander self-determination.

A high point for Indigenous advancement came with the Mabo High Court judgement overturning the concept of 'terra nullius' — a land with no people — in 1992.

More work was to follow, when calls for an apology to the Stolen Generations in the wake of the 1997 Bringing Them Home Report was met with stiff resistance by the government of John Howard in the late 1990s.
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  #108  
Old 25th September 2017, 12:46 PM
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If you've got to go, this guy's exit is a wonderful way to do it.



Laudir de Oliveira (1940 - 2017), opened the door for Brazilian percussion in rock music

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Laudir de Oliveira, a percussionist who was a former member of the band Chicago, died September 17, 2017, at the age of 77, according to the Brazilian website O Globo and numerous Facebook posts.

Chicago released a statement on their official Facebook page.

“We are saddened to learn that former Chicago percussionist Laudir de Oliveira has passed away. We're grateful for the tremendous contributions he made to the music of Chicago and the enormous talent he shared with us, and with so many others. Our thoughts are with his family and friends. Rest in Peace.”

He passed away while performing on stage in Rio. Musician Jovi Joviniano was playing with him on stage and talked about how Laudir died doing what he loved.

“He had just rained on a spectacular solo, at the end of "Fibra", a composition by Paulo Moura. It was super applauded. It was his last applause, "said Jovi, who is also a percussionist. - It was a very beautiful energy, and soon we began to play "Tenderness", a samba-choro of the K-ximbinho. he was playing a beautiful ganzá, and I even closed my eyes. Suddenly we saw that his conga was down. I looked up and he was bent over, his face on the skin of the instrument. He made his way there, in a very beautiful way. Touching, doing what he loved, being applauded and alongside his friends. If poetry exists in death, Laudir died in poetry.”

A native of Rio de Janeiro, de Oliveira started out as a percussionist in Brazil, working with Sergio Mendes and Marcos Valle. He moved to the United States in 1968 and caught the eye of rock musicians and producers. He played on Joe Cocker’s debut album, providing percussion on his hit song “Feelin’ Allright.”

In 1973, Chicago invited de Oliveira to play on their album “Chicago VI.” After playing on the album “Chicago VII” in 1975, the band invited de Oliveira to become an official member. Chicago was incorporating latin influences to their music.

In an interview with writer Debbie Kruger, Chicago members Robert Lamm and James Pankow talked about de Oliveira’s contribution to the band.

"Laudir was an incredible percussionist. He was an incredible player. He came out of Sergio Mendes. At first we experimented with using percussion in the studio, and we liked the way the percussion held the tempos together so much that we decided to keep the percussion aspect part of the band. ... Terry Kath in particular felt the need for a percussionist to keep the grooves, the tempo steady."

In 1978, de Oliveira played percussion on The Jacksons’ album “Destiny.”

As Chicago moved into a pop-oriented sound, they asked de Oliveira to leave the band in 1982. He continued doing session work as a percussionist. He played with such greats as Carlos Santana, Nina Simone, and Chick Corea.

De Oliveira moved back to Brazil and continued to perform with many popular musicians. He became the Cultural Director of the Universidade do Grande Rio. He reunited a few times with Chicago, playing with the band in 2016 in New York City, following the bands induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. De Oliveira was not included as a member in the band’s hall induction.

He leaves his wife, and three children, who live in the United States.
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  #109  
Old 28th September 2017, 01:37 PM
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Hugh Hefner, Playboy founder: now finally stiff again, or objectified - depending on your viewpoint.
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  #110  
Old 3rd October 2017, 07:58 AM
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Farewell Tom Petty.



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TOM Petty has reportedly died after being found in "full cardiac arrest" at his home in Malibu.

The legendary Free Fallin' rocker, 66, was rushed to hospital and put on life support after being found unconscious and not breathing in his Malibu home, reports TMZ.

According to the media outlet, emergency crews were unable to find a pulse and he was showing no signs of brain activity after arriving at UCLA Santa Monica Hospital.

His loved ones made the decision to switch off life support a short time later.

Petty burst onto the scene in 1976 with his band Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

They had a stream of major hits, including I Won't Back Down, American Girl, Runnin' Down A Dream and Free Fallin'.

Over the years, the rocker won 3 Grammys, racked up 18 nominations, and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

His band had just concluded their most recent tour, which started in April in honour of their 40th anniversary.
My black, jangly, electric 12 will ring in his honour.
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